Going through my iPod

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Going through iPod
Mika: WE ARE YOUNG!
Me: Not feeling that triumphant right now.
Pirates of the Caribbean: “The Kraken”
Me: Not feeling that dangerous right now.
Mission Impossible – Ghost Protocol: “Kremlin With Anticipation.”
Me: Not feeling very patriotic for mother Russia right now…
3 Doors Down: I took a walk around the world to ease my troubled mind…
Me: Not in the mood for walking or contemplation.
Mario: It seems the more I try to do right the more I lie about being at sessions and leaving at certain times….
Me: What the F**K to YOU have to complain about!? Mr. Rich and successful rap artist has too many girls!? I DUNNO WHATTA DO! F*CK that! I think I”ll delete that song from my iPod. #FirstWorldProblems
A Colbert Christmas: The Greatest Gift of All!:
“I have no money in my coffer
No gold or silver do I bring
Nor have I precious jewels to offer
To celebrate the new born king
Yet do not spurn my gift completely
Oh ye three wise men please demur
Behold a plant that smokes more sweetly
Than either Frankincense or Myrrh”
Me: Nope. Made a solemn vow never to touch the stuff until it’s legal. I have no investment in this song. I should just delete.
The Incredible Hulk: “Lonely Man Theme”
Me: Cry me a f**king emo river of green irradiated blood.
The Lord of the Rings: “Requiem For A Dream”
Me: Not feeling very epic right now…
Rihanna: Just Gonna Stand There And Watch Me Burn?
Me: Yes.
Green Lantern First Flight: Main Title
Me: Nah.
Batman: Under The Red Hood: Main Titles
Me: … Maybe…
…ah, who am I kidding.
Superman/Batman: Public Enemies: Main Titles
Me: Not feeling very political.
Lady Gaga: I’m gonna Marry The Night. I won’t give up on my life.
Me: Ehhh… If I was feeling slightly worse, then this MIGHT help, but I don’t feel THAT bad.
Megaman X5: Ending Theme
Me: Not feeling very nostalgic.
Superman/Batman: Public Enemies: Metallo
Me: Not feeling very metal.
Metal Gear Solid: An cuimhin leat an grá
Crá croí an ghrá
Níl anois ach ceol na h-oíche
Táim sioraí i ngrá
Me: Later.
Metal Gear Sold 2: I stare at the starts, and the sky up above, and think, “What am I made of?” Am I full of sorrow? Am I Hurt and Pained? Or am I filled… with Looove?
Me: …
Metal Gear Sold 2: I walk by myself, on the streets below… and ask every child I know. “Do you think tomorrow will bring sun or rain? Which one of these will show?”
Me: 🙂
Metal Gear Sold 2: I can’t say goodbye to yesterday, my friends. I keep holding on, ’till the end. Out of the darkness, there is no other way than the light leading to yesterday.
Me: …. :/ No… No looking back for comfort. I need to move on.
Metal Gear Solid 3: Son. You’ve got a way to fall. They’ll tell you were to go, but they won’t know.
Me: Duh.
Metal Gear Solid 4: Here’s to you Nicola and Bart. Rest forever here in our hearts. The last and final moment is yours. Your agony is your triumph.
Me: 😥
Metal Gear Solid Portable Ops: …
Me: Nope. Skipping.
Inception: Mind Heist.
Me: I feel so violated. OUT!
Mis Teeq: So so so so… Scandalous.
Me: lol
Maroon 5: Oh YEAH! … Oh yeah! So scared of breaking it that you won’t let it bend.
And I’ve wrote two hundred letters I will never send. Sometimes these cuts are so much deeper than they seem. You’d rather cover up. I’d rather let them be. So let me be. and I’ll set you free. I am in MISERY. There ain’t nobody who can comfort me. Why won’t you answer me? Your silence is slowly killing me. Girl you got me bad. Girl you got me bad. I’m gonna get you back. I’m gonna get you back.
Me: It felt good, but I don’t believe in revenge.
Lady Gaga: Don’t call me Gaga. He ate my heart. He a-a-ate my heart.
Me: That’s interesting, tell me more.
Gaga: Look at him. Look at me. That boy is bad and honestly. He’s a wolf in disguise. But I can’t stop staring in those evil eyes.
Me: Sounds like someone’s been put in the One Night Stand Zone, if that’s even a thing.
Juno Reactor: Asato ma sad gamaya
tamaso ma jyotir gamaya
mrtyor mamrtam gamaya
Me: Not feeling very enlightened.
Linkin Park: I remember black skies. the lightning all around me.
Me: I remember playing you on full blast as I was walking to my first class during a thunderstorm. Good times.
Gavin DeGraw: Dreams. That’s were I have to go to see your beautiful face.
Me: Not really. At least there you’re less likely to see contempt…
John Legend: Nutmeg… Sweet, sweet nutmeg. On the 25th. I’m gonna cover you with…
Me: ‘,:o
Megaman X7: Sigma Theme (Our Blood Boils)
Me: Fun Boss Fight.
Capricious Comet: (Engrish)

If you want to find
there is a world behind,
all you have to do
is to know your pride
you say you need to show
your urges to grow, but you’re wrong,
but it stopped for to me that
you really know you’re on your own (on your own)

Pick up the sky but,
I’ll make you eat the scrap,
but I ain’t to sure which of my parts I have for you
If you’re going to deny
truely, truely could you cry (could you cry)
I trust you won’t say no more
be silent til you die.

Pray the wind air grows thin
it’s in your head to live free,
noisy brain, back again
each new day, go like you say

Pray the wind air grows thin
it’s in your head to live free,
noisy brain, back again
each new day, narrowing

Me: Wow. I just googled the lyrics. I never knew. This song is golden. I understand it. I connect. I know what’s bothering me.
But… what do I do now?

Superman – The Movie: The Planet Krypton…

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Just a Male Power Fantasy…

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(This was written in response to a piece about male privilege in the comic book world.)

Keep in mind the entire superhero genre sprung from the unfulfilled romantic yearnings/self defeating masochism of young men.

Clark Kent (Superman) was the first superhero and carried a torch for Lois Lane.
Lois Lane was inspired by “Lois Amster.”
When asked half a century later, she indicated Jerry Siegel was a strange guy who had no friendship or conversation with who occasionally stared at her.

I thought: “the bastard never worked up the courage to approach her at ALL!”

In 1983, Siegel said, “Clark Kent grew not only out of my private life, but also out of Joe Shuster’s. As a high school student, I thought that someday I might become a reporter, and I had crushes on several attractive girls who either didn’t know I existed or didn’t care I existed. So it occured to me: What if I was really terrific? What if I had something special going for me, like jumping over buildings or throwing cars around or something like that? ”

My point is driven home by what Lois said to Clark in the original Action Comics #1…
Lois has to defend herself from a thug while Clark does nothing (to hide the fact that he’s Superman), but tells him: “You asked me earlier in the evening why I avoid you. I’ll tell you why now: Because you’re a spineless, unbearable coward!”

Talking to himself, much?

There’s a happy ending, though!

Siegel eventually married the original model for Lois Lane, who’s beauty, intelligence, and determination also inspired Lois’s personality.

After her husband’s death, and for most of her remaining life she continued to hound DC comics for to ensure her family got every penny that was rightfully theirs.

Following her death, Siegel’s lawyer noted, “All her life she carried the torch for Jerry and Joe — and other artists. There was a lot of Lois Lane in Joanne Siegel.”

How does this translate to how the comic book industry should operate?
…Idk … I lost my train of thought.

Superman: A Requiem of Steel

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Introduction

Superman created the precedent and template for the concept of “superhero” in 1938. Over time, he had developed into an American institution, a symbol, and a myth. To many, he is a kind face printed on children’s tightey-whiteys, a symbol of power, an inspirational, benevolent figure hovering in the skies that we are expected to “look up in the sky” toward.

But he is beyond many people’s reach. He is an untouchable, “unrelatable,” perfect demigod that no compelling story can be told with.

“Batman is way cooler.” I held this opinion for a while. He was the basic, pitiful Freudian childhood trauma that many more people can readily identify with, despite his questionable methods, vengefulness, and aristocracy.

As my reading of the DC Universe increased, however, my understanding of the heroes who stood alongside him did as well. I became “acquainted” with other heroes, and then realized Batman was not the world’s greatest superhero. Superman was.

I did not make this decision out of some elitist entitlement he procured from being the first or “most powerful” (he is not the most powerful by long shot), but because of the human being that is often overlooked in favor of the myth, legend, costume, smile, poses, powers, nationality, extraterritoriality, cape, and symbol. He is a super man. I wanted to make this abundantly clear to the reader.

DISCUSSION

Superman, despite his alien nature, is one of the most normal, emotionally well adjusted, and levelheaded of modern superheroes. His initial creation in 1938 saw him actively dealing with relevant issues of his time, like worker exploitation, domestic abuse, and mob violence (Ayoub, 2010). However, as times and editorial direction changed his battles grew more epic, dangerous, and large scale. His essentially human tale of individual potential, unrequited love, longing for acceptance, and anonymity is often overshadowed in the minds of the general public. (Darowski, 2008)

The Creators

Clark Kent’s love life was very evocative of his creator’s own longings. The Golden Age Clark Kent was depicted as a stuttering, cowardly, and extremely longing in his infatuation with Lois, whereas his behavior as Superman toward the admiring was a few snarls short of being brisk (Darowski). This was without a doubt, a self-indulgent, but very relatable, reversal of the situation. Jerry Siegel Admitted: “I had crushes on several attractive girls who either didn’t know I existed or didn’t care I existed,” he said. “It occurred to me: what if I had something going for me, like jumping over buildings or throwing cars around or something like that?” (Robert, 1996).

The Lois and Clark dynamic as been filtered throughout generations and writers. “Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman” portrayed two young, sexy, smart people who would melt in each others arms once their defenses fell, and Superman’s modern comic-book canon features a married Lois with full knowledge and access to his secret identity (Darowski).

 

The Death Of Superman

Ironically, Superman’s comic book writing team had to put off Lois and Clark’s wedding for a whole year to coincide with the tv show’s wedding, and the (in)famous “Death of Superman” storyline was to fill that gap (Timm, 2007). “The news that Superman is about to die has provoked anger and surprise, … from people who haven’t read his comic book adventures in decades(New York Times, 1992). Comic shops across the country had lines forming out of the door to buy Superman #75 (Bailey, 2002).

My initial search results almost contained at least one mention of this media sensation. Even completely unrelated news tried to jump on the potential deeper meaning of the event (Frank, 1992). He died defending Metropolis from the rampaging monster known only as Doomsday after a long drawn out fight across the country that ended at Metropolis (Jurgens, 1992). Though the story was emotionally resonant, his actual means of death reflected the increasing demand for dangerous physicality and alien, non-societal threats on the part of Superman (Timm).  The success of the story was also an indicator of how ingrained and valuable the character had become on America’s (and perhaps the world’s) collective consciousness.

Ironically the All-Star Superman was a non-canonical, but critically acclaimed storyline that exaggerated his powers, while killing him the process. The story of Superman’s epic trails his quickly risen to become one the most touching, celebrated Superman stories ever told, despite his newfound invulnerability to kryptonite and being able to lift several quintillion tons (Morrison, 2011). He had reached myth status (Rubin, 2006), and like many myths, would soon be time for him to be raised from the dead (Zinn, 1993).

 

Powers And Abilities

The audience is divided on whether Superman’s powers are inspirational (Kriegel, 2006), or a barrier to compassion on the part of the reader or critic. His powers have proven difficult to elicit a sense of peril from one whose main power is essentially the “lack of danger.” His apparent, Silver Age tendency to “juggle planets” is the most re-occurring criticism. (New York Times)

Keep in mind that Kryptonite of many shapes and colors was available in copious amounts in the Silver Age of comics (Niven, 1971). His powers in the right circumstances may allow Superman to be the ultimate power fantasy on the part of the audience. (Darowski). Grant Morrison suggested that Superman’s powers might serve to simply exaggerate his humanity and trails and triumphs that result from it.

When Superman walks his dog, Krypto, he may do it across the moon, “but he’s still walking the dog.” (2011)

Relevance

The issue of Superman’s relevance comes up from his critics (Frank). His power levels are often cited as a barrier suspense or peril, and his moral uprightness does not allow for as much dilemma as for more morally compromised heroes. Many even assert he does not even risk his life by engaging in super heroics (New York Times).

Superman’s more altruistic motives do not generate as much pity as Batman’s motives (Grossman, 2004). Not only this, but his mythic status and expectations put pressure on his current stories (Jennings, 2009). He is a difficult sell.

Heroic Ideal

As the heroic ideal changes, so does Superman. In his early days, Superman was very belligerent, threatening, and socially active (Ayoub). However, this changed as new writers came on board after the creators left the title (Darowski). Hegel might attribute this to gradual cohesion of different identities (Darkowski). Though he initially had no such problem, writers have taken extra steps to make sure he’s “humanized” especially after the 1980s (New York Times, 1992).

The Movie

Before his death in 1992, the 1978 Superman The Movie directed by Richard Donner and starring Christopher Reeve became a cherished a collective memory of the Superman myth unfolding that is to this day. In the introduction of Superman: Secret Origin (Johns & Frank, 2010), David S. Goyer admitted he waited several hours when he was 11 to secure tickets to opening night. After the movie, David resolved to one-day make comic book movies.

Goyer grew up to co-write Batman Begins and The Dark Knight. In 2010, Goyer was selected to write the reboot of the Superman film franchise. However, the sequels were less than stellar (Frank).  His likeness has become synonymous with Superman in the minds of many (Kriegel), so much so that artist Gary Frank may oft use his likeness in his artwork (Frank, 2010).

Reeve even played a pivotal role in the series, Smallville up until his death (Kate, 2005).

In 2008, Donner joined forces with his apprentice, the prominent superstar writer, Geoff Johns, on a story arc entitled Last Son. The story served to incorporate several film elements into the modern DC Universe canon, but introduced Superman’s adopted Kryptonian son, aptly named “Christopher Kent.”

Audience

Despite all of this, flaws have been more easily found in praiseworthy figures in recent times, despite their ever-presence (Niebuhr, 1921). In the intro to the Secret Origin (Johns), Goyer said stated, “He’s not someone the reader can readily identify with.” However, the idea of Superman that has taken the most hits, not the character himself (Grossman).

His death put several dents in the notion of the character’s infallibility in our collective consciousness, and even they agreed that he’d be more interesting upon his resurrection (New York Times).

Conclusion

The author of this paper believes Superman to be one of the most human, emotionally well-adjusted superheroes. However, his history belies the critiques, but underscore them with more uncomfortable humanity. The audience’s apparent preference for tragedy and moral degradation of the hero may say something about the reader’s presupposed relationship between himself and a fictional (superhero) character.

This presupposition may yet be satisfied by the Golden Age Superman’s overtly threatening tendencies as well as decreased power levels (his ability to leap tall buildings was the limit to his “flight” powers, initially). Grant Morrison has described the original as an “angry socialist.” But this is not to say the modern Superman lacks the potential for a compelling arc in light of the increased power and level-headedness.

“They were always wrong. Superman‘s greatest vulnerability isn’t from some meteor rock. It is from something far more human…
…his heart.”
–Batman (Loeb, 2005)

Our seemingly collective, American resistance to recognizing shared humanity, especially in its most stellar manifestation, speaks volumes of our readiness to discriminate outsiders.

Kara Zor-El: “You’re their champion. Bigger than life. No wonder the eyeglasses work– nobody would look for you dressed like them!”
Clark Kent: “Kara… There’s no them. It’s just us. (Loeb)

BIBLIOGRAPHY

(1992, October 4). When Superman Gets Boring. New York Times. p. 16. Retrieved from EBSCOhost..

Ayoub, N. C. (2010). Superman’s Staying Power. Chronicle of Higher Education, 56(23), B16. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

Darowski, Joseph J. (2008). It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s .. synthesis: superman, clark kent, and hegel’s dialectic. Journal of Comic Art, 10(1), 461-470.

Enger, P. T. (2010). In Pineda R. (Ed.), The mediated hero: Superman in the post 9/11 era. United States — Texas: Communication. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/854508180?accountid=8483

FRANK, R. (1992, November 22). Term Limit for the Man of Steel: Yes, It’s Time for Him to Go. New York Times. p. 1. Retrieved from EBSCOhost..

Frisby, E. (1979). Nietzsche’s influence on the superman in science fiction literature. United States — Florida: The Florida State University. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/302900803?accountid=8483

GAUDIOSI, J. (2010). THE COMIC CONNECTION. Computer Graphics World, 33(10), 22-26. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

Grossman, L., Lofaro, L., & Ressner, J. (2004). The Problem with SUPERMAN. Time, 163(20), 70-72. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

Jennings, J. S. (2009). Understanding superheroes: Scholarship, superman, and the synthesis of an emerging criticism. United States — Arkansas: University of Arkansas. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/304845434?accountid=8483

Jessica, S. (n.d). ‘Science of Superman’ breaks down his strengths. USA Today. Retrieved from EBSCOhost..

Johns, G., Donner, R., & Kubert, A. (2008). Superman: Last son. New York: DC Comics.

Johns, G., Frank, G., Sibal, J., Anderson, B., & Wands, S. (2010). Superman: Secret origin. New York, N.Y: DC Comics.

KATE, A. (2005, February 23). The Past Catches Up With a Future Superman. New York Times. p. 3. Retrieved from EBSCOhost..

Kirk, A. J. (2009). In Gray J. (Ed.), “Sometimes you’ll feel like an outcast”: Using superman to interrogate the closet. United States — Illinois: Speech Communication. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/304996382?accountid=8483

Kriegel, L. (2006). Superman’s Shoulders: On the Healing Power of Illusion. In , Southwest Review (pp. 258-267). Southern Methodist University. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

Liu, S., Page, B., Timm, B., McDuffie, D., LaPaglia, A., Asner, E., Denton, J., … Warner Bros. Entertainment. (2011). All-star Superman. Burbank, Calif.: Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Loeb, J., Turner, M., & Steigerwald, P. (2005). Superman, Batman: Supergirl. New York, NY: DC Comics.

Niebuhr, R. R. (1921). Heroes and Hero Worship. Nation, 112(2903), 293-294. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

ROBERT McG. THOMAS, J. r. (1996, January 31). Jerry Siegel, Superman’s Creator, Dies at 81. New York Times. p. 6. Retrieved from EBSCOhost..

Rubin, L., & Livesay, H. (2006). Look, up in the sky! Using superheroes in play therapy. International Journal of Play Therapy, 15(1), 117-133. doi:10.1037/h0088911

Sternlieb, J. L. (2006). Review of: It’s a Bird… Families, Systems, & Health, 24(3), 353-354. doi:10.1037/1091-7527.24.3.353

Timm, B., Capizzi, D., Montgomery, L., Vietti, B., Baldwin, A., Heche, A., Marsters, J., … Warner Home Video (Firm). (2007). Superman: Doomsday. Burbank, CA: Warner Home Video.

Zinn, L. (1993). IT’S A BIRD, IT’S A PLANE — IT’S A RESURRECTION. BusinessWeek, (3314), 40. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

My “letter” to DC about Wonder Woman, Supergirl, and Apocalypse (that I finally sent electronically)

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Hello, my name is Daniel Ballow and today I’d like to talk to you about sexism. Especially regarding the release of Superman/Batman: Apocalypse. (Or as it should have been called, “Superman/Batman: Supergirl.”)
Before I continue I’d like to give some background information:

I do not readily identify myself as a “feminist,” but I am a gender egalitarian and opposed to sexism. I believe holding onto our fixed gendered perspective and focusing on what separates us, and what has been separating us is a barrier to true gender equality. I believe modern feminism often sabotages itself in this regard.

I believe that something is only a gender issue when the person performing the action or the observer contextualizes it as such. There is almost always an explanation for things that don’t necessarily have anything to do with these things.

I’m not one to cry “objectification” whenever artists tend to fall into the tendency to “idealize” female heroes. Most living creatures sexual objects alongside whatever else we are, and it would be dehumanizing to mask that fact (though this does not excuse nonsensical renderings, and poses that serve no storytelling purpose. I’d chalk that up to “bad storytelling, not sexism).

I give this context to set up that I firmly believe that something is only a gender issue when it is contextualized as such, and I am decidedly hesitant to label something as “sexist” for the aforementioned reason. But in spite of all of this, the more I thought about the title of Superman/Batman: Apocalypse, the more I realized how undeniably sexist this name-change was, and how it would be hypocritical of me not to object to it.

Superman/Batman: Supergirl (I read the story in paperback form) is one of my favorite Superman stories of all time. As far as I am currently aware, the original storyline aptly titled “The Supergirl from Krypton” sold very well, as well as the trade paperback. (Be sure to respond with any contrary data so my disappointment will subside, please.)

It was exciting news that the Superman/Batman: Public Enemies movie would be followed up by an adaptation of the “The Supergirl from Krypton.” But it was a peculiar move to name the movie “Apocalypse.” The movie itself was stellar, featured one of the best-animated fight sequences of all time with (ironically) Wonder Woman. The adaption from the source material was true to the spirit of the source material, so why the name change?

According to a newsarma interview:

“I think the main reason why they didn’t call this piece Supergirl is because for some reason the Wonder Woman home video that we made, which was very, very good and filled with (fe)male* characters, didn’t sell well,” she told us. “And so marketing people said, female titled pieces don’t sell well. So this is a female piece, it’s got a very strong feminine character in it but they called it Superman/Batman: Apocalypse just to get people to come into the video stores and buy them.”

http://www.newsarama.com/film/superman-batman-apocalypse-interviews-100929.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+Newsaramasite+%28Newsarama.com%29

I spoke with my father about this some time ago before writing this. He asserted that chauvinism wasn’t the motive behind the name change, and that the decision was of pure monetary motivation. I would not argue that the decision was sexist, but the thought process behind the decision was sexist. Because according to the marketing people’s assertion, “female titles don’t sell.”

It became sexist when gender was contextualized as the reason behind Wonder Woman’s less-than-ideal sales. They made this a gender issue, and I will call them out for doing so.

According to www.the-numbers.com, the “consumer spending for Wonder Woman was listed as $6,974,613. Batman: Gotham Knight was listed as $8,059,255. Superman: Doomsday was listed as $9,442,880.

At face value, this data would back up their claim, but there are other reasons for this.
First, the Batman animated movies were riding off the success of the ’89 film all the way to the Joel Shoemaker movie, the award winning animated series (airing around the time I was first cognizant, contributing to me becoming the DC fan I am today), The Batman, and Batman Beyond.
When you generate movies and television shows in such a way, it generates nostalgia for young viewers. You create “comfortable memories” associated with the character.

Superman has the success of the Richard Donner/Christopher Reeve film series, The Lois and Clark tv show, Superman the Animated Series, Superman Returns, and Smallville.

If you look closely, there is a direct correlation between the success of the animated movies and the legion of fans generated by different media.

Wonder Woman has not had a solo television series since 1979. To expect her animated movie to perform as well as Gotham Knight or Doomsday is like asking Batman to rely only on the success of the Adam West tv show. There are not many young fans left that have grown up with Wonder Woman outside of her “Superfriends” and “Justice League” appearances.

Wonder Woman has not had an award-winning animated series, another animated series, a romantic comedy, a primetime drama, a beloved classic that’s generated more comic book writers than any other, or a highly successful reboot.
She’s only had her solo comic book series for decades, and Lynda Carter. On that alone, however, the sales of her animated movie outsold Green Lantern: First Flight ($6,070,921), Justice League: The New Frontier ($5,232,076), Justice League: Crisis on Two Earths ($5,220,061), Batman: Under The Red Hood ($6,656,692), and Superman/Batman: Apocalypse ($5,847,410).

Superman/Batman: Public Enemies had the advantage of featuring both Superman and Batman, making it to ($7,996,266). Yet, that by itself apparently was not enough to guarantee the success of the sequel. “Supergirl” was consciously removed from the title because “girls don’t sell.”
(That’s right… the Catwoman film featuring Halle Berry movie did poorly because she’s a woman…*)
*Sarcastic.

The title of the project was affectively changed on a dubious, gender biased decision.
How could you let this happen?
The title was not “just changed.” A poor business decision was made. Not everyone knows Supergirl even exists. The potential, interest in the origin of this prospective character may have been lost because the title
As it is, a passive observer might interpret:
a) a vague reference to the Fourth World by Jack Kirby, something that even less people know about, or…
b) indicating the name of another disaster movie.
I was fishing through back issues one day, as a couple walking into a comic book store for the first time, apparently. The girl was presently surprised by the amount of female heroes there were (as she should be). Then remarked at astonishment, that a “Super-woman” existed (referring to the Supergirl statue she was eyeing.)

The thing that upsets me more than sexism is hypocrisy. I would prefer to think that DC comics to take the principles their beloved icons fight for very seriously.

I’m not asking anyone’s resignation.
I would like this letter, or the summarized contents thereof, to be drilled into the skulls of whoever is responsible for this.
I would like some kind of public indicator that this ought not to have happened at all.
I want nothing like this to EVER happen again.

Sincerely,
-Daniel

If DC heroes sung: “We Are The World”…

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[Billy Batson]
There comes a time
When we heed a certain call.
[Kara Zor-El and Stephanie Brown]
When the world must come together as one.
[Courtney Whitmore]
There are people dying.
[Jennifer-Lynn Hayden]
And it’s time to lend a hand to life
The greatest gift of all.
[Hal Jordan]
We can’t go on
Pretending day by day
[Clark Kent]
that someone, somehow will soon make a change.
[Helene Bertinelli]
We are all a part of
God’s great big family
[Donna Troy]
And the truth, you know love is all we need

[Jon Stewart]
We are the world
We are the children
[Firestorm]
We are the ones to make the Brightest Day
So let’s start giving.
[Cassie Sandsmark]
There’s a choice we’re making
We’re saving our own lives
It’s true we’ll make a better day
Just you and me

[Koriand’r]
Send them your heart
So they’ll know that someone cares
[Jamie Reyes]
so their cries for help
will not be in vain
[Mari McCabe]
We can’t let them suffer
no we cannot turn away
[John Henry Irons]
Right now they need a helping hand
[Markus Clay]
We are the world
We are the Children
[Roy Harper]
We are the ones who make a brighter day
so lets start giving.
[Grace Choi]
There’s a choice we’re making
We’re saving our own lives
[Michael Holt]
It’s true we’ll make a better day
Just you and me.

[Barry Allen]
When you’re down and out
There seems no hope at all.
[Wally West]
But if you just believe
There’s no way we can fall
[Diana]
Well, well, well, well, let us realize
That a change can only come
[joined by Hawkman and Hawkgirl together]
When we stand together as one.

[Chorus – All]
We are the world
We are the children
We are the ones who make a brighter day
So let’s start giving
[Gar Logan]
Got to start giving
[All]
There’s a choice we’re making
We’re saving our own lives
[Natasha Irons]
It’s true we’ll make a better day
Just you and me
[Karen Beecher-Duncan]
We are the world
We are the children
[Jay Garrick]
Its for the children
[Dick Grayson]
We are the ones who make a brighter day
[Tim Drake]
So lets start giving.

[Virgil Harkins]
There’s a choice we’re making
We’re saving our own lives
It’s true we’ll make a better day
Just you and me

[Booster Gold]
We are the world
[Mary Batson]
We are the children
We are the ones who make a brighter day
So let’s start giving
[Jefferson Pierce]
There’s a choice we’re making
We’re saving our own lives
It’s true we make a better day
Just you and me.

[Victor Stone]
We are the world
We are the children
We are the ones who make a brighter day
So let’s start giving
[Bruce Wayne]
There’s a choice were making
we’re saving our own lives
It’s true we’ll make a better day
Just you and me.

[Super Young Team]
We all need somebody that we can lean on
when you wake up look around and see that your dreams gone
when the earth quakes we’ll help you make it through the storm
when the floor breaks a magic carpet to stand on
we are the World united by love so strong
when the radio isn’t on you can hear the songs
a guided light on the dark road your walking on
a sign post to find the dreams you thought was gone
someone to help you move the obstacles you stumbled on
someone to help you rebuild after the rubble’s gone
we are the World connected by a common bond
Love the whole planet sing it along.

Silence… then suddenly…
[Chorus- All with emphasis by…]
[Dinah Lance]
We are the world
We are the children
[Arthur Curry]
We are the ones who make a brighter day
So let’s start giving

[Mia Dearden]
There’s a choice were making
we’re saving our own lives
It’s true we’ll make a better day
Just you and me.

[Oliver Queen]
Everyday citizens
everybody pitching in

[Superboy]
You and I
You and I
[Guy Gardner]
Uh, 12 days no water
whats your will to live?
[Carol Ferris]
we amplified the love we watching multiply
[Raven]
Feeling like the Worlds end
we can make the World win
[Dr. Light]
Like Coast or Star City, Gotham, or Bludhaven.
and now Japan needs us, they need us, we need you.

[Chorus – All- repeat till fade to nothingness.]

[Never The End…]____________________________________________________

(The situation in Japan is just so damn horrible.
With all the disasters likewise befalling the DCU, I wondered how THEY would pull together a cover of this song, (and likewise whether or not this history altering event will be canonized in that universe. Probably… I was actually thinking of this BEFORE that happened. So I figured now’s the best time to unveil this silly little idea in my head.)
(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Glny4jSciVI based mostly on this version.)